Top Materials that Can Be Recycled After Demolition

Demolition and construction waste are quite heavy and voluminous and account for about 35% of the waste generated. Reuse of demolition waste is an important process in the building’s life cycle. This is because efficient recycling practices and material reclamation can divert over 80% of the structure’s material from the landfill. In this post, we tell you about the different materials that can be recycled and to what.

BRICKS, BLOCKS, AND CONCRETE

Wastage of concrete is estimated to be about 5%, while block and brick is about 7%. You can recycle them by crushing them into rubble. The process involves sorting, screening, and removing contaminants. Reclaimed brick or concrete can be used in concrete fill, road base, and aggregate.

GYPSUM

Gypsum is one of the materials that fill our landfills. It is known to have a lot of sulfates and biodegradable waste. This explains why it has been banned in some regions to prevent the accumulation of hydrogen sulfide gas that is odorless and toxic. The good thing about this material is that you can recycle it easily. Contaminants ought to be removed like nails and screws. You can ground it to form pellets. You can sell the gypsum to manufacturers that use it for other applications.

WOOD

Wood waste from different building sites can easily fill our landfills from construction companies in Northwest Arkansas, like us. It can be repurposed, recycled, reused, or burned as bioenergy. Also, you can use wood in coverings, pathways, compost, particleboard, mulches, and animal bedding.

GLASS

Thousands of tons of glass are manufactured each year. Most of the glass goes into glazing products for the buildings. However, recycled glass content is only about 20%. There are different ways for recycling glass to make it fit for repurposing such as screening, crushing to get rid of contamination, washing, and drying. You can use glass for decoration, in the manufacture of ceramics and bricks.

METALS

It is unfortunate that millions of tons of metal go to waste each year. Surprisingly, half of it is valuable scrap metal. You can collect metals, sort them, and then shred. The scrap can be melted and purified and used for other purposes.

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